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Fund Your AT > Funding for Telecommunications

Funding for Telecommunications

This guide provides information on where to access free telecommunications equipment for people with disabilities as well as free relay services. Keep in mind that services, equipment, and providers are changing and evolving rapidly. Please contact us if you discover updated information that belongs here.

MassMATCH and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services make no endorsement, representation, or warranty expressed or implied for any product, device, or information set forth on this website. Neither MassMATCH nor the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has examined, reviewed, or tested any product or device contained on the MassMATCH website.

Overview: About technology and relay services

Technology helps people with disabilities to make phone calls in a variety of ways: through a standard phone line, wireless service, or internet service connection傭y voice, text or sign language. Specialized telephone equipment can amplify volume, use different alerting signals (to make users aware of incoming calls), provide oversized buttons, and send (and receive) text through Telecommunications Relay Services (TRS) to communicate with phone users who do not have TTYs. Computers, videophones, Web cams, and wireless mobile devices connect people who are deaf or hard of hearing to each other and, with the help of relay services, to hearing users. People with physical and/or speech disabilities also make use of relay services and specialized equipment.

Telecommunications Relay Services (TRS) are free to all users. The Americans with Disabilities Act (1990) and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) require that telephone companies provide relay services so that telephone access for people with disabilities is "functionally equivalent" to the access available to people without disabilities. Interstate TRS are provided by each long distance carrier, and each carrier is reimbursed through the Interstate Telecommunications TRS Fund (which they pay into). In 2002, Video Relay Services (VRS) became reimbursable by the Fund in addition to "traditional" relay and, as result, VRS providers are now multiplying quickly. In addition, each state contracts a TRS provider to provide in-state TRS via 711.

Learn more at the FCC's website, the FCC Accessibility Clearinghouse website, and the Coalition of Organizations for Accessible Technology (COAT) website.

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Free or low cost accessible telephone and/or TTY equipment

Massachusetts Equipment Distribution Program (MassEDP)

The Massachusetts Equipment Distribution Program (MassEDP) is a program of the Massachusetts State 911 Department, an agency within the Massachusetts Office of Public Safety and Security. The program is no longer run by Verizon and equipment is now provided directly by MassEDP. Anyone with a verifiable disability can access specialized equipment free of charge or at reduced cost depending on the applicant's household income. To apply you need a standard land-line phone service provider (Vonage customers are not eligible because they do not pay into the Interstate Telecommunications Fund which funds the program). Once in the program, your equipment is maintained, repaired or replaced at no cost for life, so long as you do not dispose of the original equipment. If broken equipment is thrown away, you will have to reapply to the program and possibly pay another co-pay to replace the device. Read more.

Who is Eligible:

To be eligible for free or reduced-cost equipment you must:

  • be a resident of Massachusetts;
  • have access to residential telephone service (land line);
  • have your disability verified by a MA licensed physician or audiologist;
  • complete an application (at this Dept of Public Safety EDP web page) and submit it for certification to the appropriate state disabilities agency (the Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing or the Massachusetts Commission for the Blind).

How are Services Provided?

Once your application has been approved by a state agency of disability services, MassEDP will contact you by phone or mail you an acceptance letter if they cannot reach you by phone. You are then referred to your nearest MassEDP office for appropriate equipment. If you have a mobility impairment, a cognitive disability, or are legally blind, MassEDP will provide a home visit to demonstrate and install the equipment for you. If you have low vision, are deaf or hard of hearing, or have a speech disability, you will go to your nearest MassEDP office to test and select appropriate equipment.

What AT Services are Provided?

MassEDP provides specialized telephone/TTY equipment (for use with standard land-line phone service) at no cost to applicants whose household income is below $50,000/year (adjusted upwards according to the number of household dependents). Households with incomes above this threshold receive equipment valued under $100 for free or pay a co-pay of 1/3 the cost of the equipment if it is a more costly item. Equipment demonstration and technical assistance are provided at local MassEDP offices or in your home, depending on your type of disability. Maintenance, repair, and replacement services are provided at no cost so long as you do not dispose of the original equipment provided through the program. Membership is for life.

Contact:

Grant Harrison, EDP manager
Massachusetts Equipment Distribution Program
800-300-5658 Voice/TTY
Mon - Fri 8:30am to 5:00pm
MassEDP web page
grant.harrison@state.ma.us

Safelink Wireless

Safelink Wireless is a government program that provides a free cell phone and air-time each month for income-eligible customers.

Who is Eligible?

You are eligible for Safelink if you :

  • Have a household income of 135% or less of the federal poverty level. You automatically qualify if you are a current recipient of one of the following programs:
    • Emergency Aid to the Elderly, Disabled and Children
    • Social Security Income
    • Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program
    • Food Stamps
    • MassHealth
    • Transitional Aid To Families with Dependent Children
    • Fuel Assistance
  • Have a valid US Postal address. PO Boxes are not acceptable for shipping.
  • Are not already receiving Lifeline Assistance through another phone carrier and no one in your household is receiving this assistance (you must first cancel Lifeline to receive Safelink).

What AT is Provided?

In Massachusetts the program provides a free cell phone and 80 minutes of airtime each month. You also have the option to purchase additional airtime.

Contact:

To learn more or apply visit: www.safelink.com
Call 1-800-977-3768 to check your enrollment status.

Project Independence: 9-1-1 for Everyone

This privately-funded program is providing low-income people with disabilities who are residents of Boston, Brookline, and Newton (and surrounding areas) with free emergency-only cell phones. The phones will connect with 911 emergency services only. Read more.

Who Is Eligible?

Anyone who has a doctor's letter confirming a disability or is a recipient of SSDI, SSI, or Mass Rehabilitation Commission services qualifies. Income eligibility is somewhat flexible.

What AT is Provided?

A cell phone from Cell Tech. The phone works only to call 911 and cannot be used for paid phone services.

Contact:

Boston:

617-338-6665 (Karen Schneiderman, Boston Center for Independent Living)

Newton:

617-277-5131 (Donna Suskawicz, founding director, Irving K. Zola Center)

Brookline:

617-730-2414 (Officer Ron McNeil, Brookline Police)

email: zolacenter@juno.com

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Free videophones and Web cams

Sorenson Communications: VP-100 or VP-200 videophone

Sorenson Communications (based in Salt Lake City, Utah) distributes its videophones nationwide and free of charge to people who are deaf or hard of hearing and primarily use sign language to communicate. Videophones are used with a television and broad band internet connection (minimum of 256K connection) to link people with disabilities to each other and葉hrough a video relay service (VRS)葉o standard phone users. Read more.

Who is Eligible?

Deaf or hard of hearing people who primarily use sign language to communicate can apply for a free videophone if they have a high speed internet connection. Hearing people who use sign language to communicate with the deaf community are not eligible for Sorenson videophones and the products are not available for purchase. Hearing consumers can purchase a Web cam (for use with a PC) in order to communicate with Sorenson users.

How are AT Services Provided?

Sorenson processes applications (completed at their website: www.sorenson.com) and connects applicants to a local installer. Due to the high demand for the free Sorenson VRS equipment/videophone, it can sometimes take several weeks for the videophone to be installed.

What AT is Provided?

Applicants may receive a VP-200 (learn about them at www.sorenson.com), plus training and installation. The VP-200 incorporates a visual caller ID feature (VP-200 users can assign a unique light signaling pattern for incoming calls), a call waiting and hold feature, and a pan/tilt/zoom feature that allows users to remain seated while adjusting the camera lens. This last feature is especially useful for people with mobility challenges.

Contact:

www.sorenson.com/support
email: support@sorenson.com
(866) 877-9826 TTY
(866) 496-6111
(801) 287-9495 FAX (ATTN: Tech Support)

Videophone: (801) 287-9403
Please hold until a technician answers.
If you hang up, you will be disconnected.

Sorenson Technical Support Department
4393 South Riverboat Road Suite 300
Salt Lake City, UT 84123

Snap!VRS: the Ojo videophone

Snap!VRS is distributing free Ojo PVP 900 videophones (and routers) to US residents who are deaf, hard of hearing, or who have a speech disability. Read more.

Who is Eligible?

To be eligible for a free Ojo PVP 900 and a router, you must:

  • be a new Snap!VRS customer
  • be a U.S. citizen
  • be deaf, hard of hearing, or have a speech disability
  • use sign language to communicate
  • have a valid telephone number (or Snap!VRS will provide you with one)
  • have access to a broad band internet service. Snap!VRS recommends a minimum connection speed of 256 Kbps
  • have a valid address for receiving 911 emergency services and package deliveries (i.e. P.O. boxes are not accepted)
  • be at least 18 years old or have the approval of a parent or guardian
  • complete an application at this Snap!VRS web page

What AT is Provided?

One Ojo PVP 900 and one router are available to eligible applicants. In-home installation and training are not available.

The Ojo videophone and service is different from other VRS options. The Ojo does not require a television (it has its own screen), and it works as a wireless device, allowing users to make calls wherever a high speed internet connection is available. Ojos can also make unlimited international calls to other Ojo users.

Hearing people may purchase an Ojo ($299 for the 900 model), but they must also pay a $14.95/month or $164/year service fee (as of 03/10). The Ojo holds 20 minutes of video voice mail. The Ojo can be programmed to recognize your current telephone number or the same number as a non-Ojo VP used on the same network. Ojo VPs also support single line "voice carry over," and may be used to call or receive calls from non-Ojo videophones and Web cams.

How are AT Services Provided?

Applications are available at this Snap!VRS web page. Once an application is approved and an Ojo is available, a shipment notification email is sent. Snap!VRS reports that due to the large volume of applicants, there may be a waiting list for the equipment. Ojo VPs and routers are mailed with a "quick start" guide and ASL video instructions. In-home installation and training services are not available.

Contact:

www.snapvrs.com
info@snapvrs.com
Snap Telecommunications, Inc.
1 Blue Hill Plaza, 14th Floor
P.O. Box 1626
Pearl River, NY 10965
(845) 652-7109 FAX
VP: ask.snapvrs.com
Ojo: 711-SNAP (7627)

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Free or low cost computer equipment

National Cristina Foundation

The National Cristina Foundation directs donations of used computer equipment to non profit organizations, schools, and public agencies throughout the United States. These organizations train people with disabilities, students at risk and economically disadvantaged persons to lead more independent and productive lives. To be added to their network of partner organizations, organizations with not-for-profit 501(c)(3) status, and public schools or public agencies need to submit an NCF Grant Application, which is available on line at this National Cristina Foundation web page.

National Cristina Foundation
500 West Putnam Avenue
Greenwich, CT  06830
(203) 863-9100

SHARE Foundation, Inc.

Custom-designed assistive computer technology for people with disabilities. SHARE has provided technology to people with cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, ALS, muscular dystrophy, as well as those disabled by strokes, accidents, and head injury. Most clients are not self-supporting and receive SHARE equipment and training at little or no cost.

SHARE Foundation
285 Old Westport Road
North Dartmouth, MA 02747
(508) 999-8482 Voice
(508) 999-8489 FAX
www.share.umassd.edu
Email: SHARE@umassd.edu

Recycles.org

Recycles.Org is a national exchange network hosting the Nonprofit Computer Recycling and Reuse Network and the Nonprofit Materials Exchange Network. Donation seekers can also post donation requests with them.

www.recycles.org

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Traditional Relay葉ext-to-speech using a TTY

TTY-based TRS is a free service that relays phone calls to and from people who are deaf, hard of hearing or speech disabled through the use of a "text telephone" (TTY) device and a relay operator. TRS is provided by each long distance carrier through a toll-free number (contact them directly), and within each state by dialing 711. In Massachusetts, 711 relay access is now provided by the Massachusetts State 911 Department, an agency within the Massachusetts Office of Public Safety and Security. (Learn more at this Mass Relay web page ).

Who is Eligible

Anyone can call 711 or any other TRS service at no charge.

How are Services Provided?

By dialing 711 on a TTY or standard telephone, deaf users are connected to a relay operator, also known as a Communications Assistant (CA). Like 411 for information, 711 is available nationwide; it connects callers to their local state TRS provider. In Massachusetts the service is known as MassRelay and is provided by Hamilton Relay. Nationwide 711 relay works with VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) providers as well as wireless and standard phone-line service carriers. There are some multi-lingual relay operators available.

When a person with a hearing or speech disability initiates a TRS call, the person uses a TTY or other text device to call 711 (or another TRS toll free number) and then types the number of the party he or she is calling. The CA places the outbound voice call to that person and the CA then relays communication, converting voice to text and text to voice between the two parties. The text is read on a display screen or paper printout. The text user types "GA" for "Go Ahead" when he or she is ready for a response, and "SK" to close a conversation. CAs must relay calls verbatim unless a user requests something different. CAs are required to abide by the confidentiality rules outlined by the FCC in Section 705 of the Communications Act (and outlined in the TRS rules 47 C.F.R. ァ 64.604). Mandatory minimum standards can be found at this FCC web page.

Hearing callers may dial 711 and provide the CA their party's 10 digit TTY number and other important information they may want to convey (their name and name of the party they are calling). The hearing caller says "Go Ahead" when he or she is ready for a response.

What Services are Provided?

The following additional services are provided in conjunction with TTY-based relay:

  • Voice Carry Over (VCO): this type of TRS allows a person who does not hear well, but can speak for themselves to use her or her own voice and directly speak to the called party, while still receiving text from the CA. "Late Deafened" individuals, such as senior citizens often prefer this service.
  • VCO to VCO: this service allows two deaf parties who speak for themselves to call one another through the use of a CA. The CA types the conversation, and the deaf callers read the text, and voice their responses.
  • Hearing Carry Over (HCO): this type of TRS is useful for people with speech disabilities who can hear well. He or she can listen to the called party and type his or her part of the conversation on a TTY. The CA voices their text.
  • Speech-to-Speech (STS) Relay: this type of TRS enables persons with a speech disability to make telephone calls using their own voice (or an assistive voice device). A CA who is specially trained to understand speech disorders re-voices what the caller says to be more understandable to the called party. No special telephone is required, as no typing is necessary. Some long distance carriers have separate 800 numbers for STS TRS.
  • Spanish language TRS: Spanish speaking CAs are available for TRS. Some long distance carriers have separate 800 numbers for Spanish TRS.
  • MassRelay CAs are trained to allow callers to place direct dial, third party, collect and calling card calls.
  • 900 # calling is available.
  • Callers may use their personal choice of long distance carrier for toll calls.
  • Callers may also register their user preferences with MassRelay and stipulate what long distance carrier and services he or she prefers.
  • 911 dialing is not recommended for TRS. Callers are encouraged to maintain a land line and a TTY to directly dial 911 in case of an emergency.

Contact:

MassRelay web page

To make a relay call:
711 for all relay services except Spanish-to-Spanish
(866) 930-9252 for Spanish-to-Spanish
(800) 439-2370 for TTY and ASCII only
(800) 439-0183 for Voice (hearing) only
(866) 887-6619 for Voice Carry Over only
(866) 645-9870 for Speech-to-Speech only

For MassRelay customer service:
(800) 720-3480 TTY and ASCII
(800) 720-3479 Voice (hearing)
E-mail: customerservice@massrelay.com

For TRS Complaints:
Massachusetts Department of Telecommunications and Cable
One South Station, Boston MA 02110
(617) 305-3531 Voice
(800) 392-6066 Voice
(617) 478-2591 FAX
(800) 323-3298 TTY
E-mail: consumer.complaints@state.ma.us

Click here for a list of national relay providers including providers of traditional relay.

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IP-Relay葉ext to speech from a computer or mobile device

Computers with any form of internet access can also make use of IP ("Internet Protocol")-Relay services, allowing anyone who can create text on their computer (including those with speech and/or physical disabilities) to have that text converted to speech over a traditional phone line and speech converted to text using a "Communication Assistant" (CA). Wireless service providers and Instant Messaging software also make IP-Relay possible to those who use mobile devices. The service is not required by the FCC, but numerous TRS and VRS providers are offering IP-Relay.

IP-Relay from mobile devices and computers has meant that deaf and hard of hearing callers no longer have to find a TTY to make a text relay phone call. In addition, VRS users can simultaneously make use of IP-Relay (through the same provider) to send and receive information that is best detailed as text for the sake of accuracy (such as airline reservation numbers and other data). These calls are also free. There is no way to determine the point of origin for billing, and so IP-Relay users pay nothing beyond their internet service provider charges (ISP) to communicate with standard phone users. Mobile device charges may apply, however.

Who Uses IP-Relay?

Anyone with a disability who uses text to communicate can make use of this free service to reach standard phone users. Hearing callers can also use the service to reach IP-Relay users by dialing the user's ten digit number (the person they are calling must be logged in on a computer or mobile device, in order to receive the call).

IP-Relay is particularly useful for deaf users needing to place a phone call while on the road. In the absence of a standard phone line and a TTY, IP-Relay is available so long as their wireless device has a signal.

IP-Relay also has advantages over traditional relay for people with low vision. Computer users can adjust the screen for a larger text display area, adjust text sizes and colors for easier reading, and conversations may be printed or saved. In addition, users can provide up-front call instructions to the CA (i.e. CAs can type at a slower speed if needed).

How are Services Provided?

IP-Relay provides the same service as traditional TTY-based relay, but uses a broad band or dial up internet connection instead of a phone line. The service makes use of either the company's own software (available for download) or AIM or MSN Messenger. Users reach a CA on their computer screen or mobile device and provide the number they are calling and any other calling instructions. The CA relays text to speech and speech to text to facilitate the call.

IP-Relay users must register with a preferred (default) provider and get a ten digit telephone number to use IP-Relay. This ensures the user efficient 911 access. The preferred provider may be changed at any time (and the user may retain their ten digit number). The user can still use any IP-Relay service to make IP-Relay calls. Users must obtain separate ten digit phone numbers for VRS and IP-Relay services. They may get separate ten digit numbers for different devices (such as a device at the office).

What Services are Provided?

  • text-to-speech and speech-to-text relay services are available in English and Spanish (most providers).
  • HCO (hearing carry over) and VCO (voice carry over) are generally available if the user also has 2 phone lines w/3 way conferencing capability; this means a person with a speech disability may choose HCO to directly hear the person they are calling, but still use text to communicate, and a person who speaks but does not hear may use VCO to communicate with their own voice.
  • Mail options, address books, and other special features are advertised by different providers seeking to distinguish their IP-Relay services. Shop around!
  • Unlike traditional relay, 900 number toll calls are NOT available (since IP-Relay calls are not billed to you).
  • Calls within continental US and territories are free.
  • 911 dialing is available for IP-Relay. IP-Relay users register with a preferred (default) provider and provide their name and location. This is their "registered location." This allows the IP-Relay provider to route the call to the appropriate 911 call center. All IP-Relay users must register and get a ten digit number. Keep in mind, however, that IP-Relay and VRS are not available if there is a power outage or loss of internet connection. A standard landline with a TTY to directly dial 911 is the most reliable option.

Contact:

Click here for a list of national relay providers including providers of IP-Relay.

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Video Relay Service (VRS)穆igns to speech by videophone or Web cam

Broad band internet has enabled videophones (used with a TV or their own built-in display) and Web cams (used with a computer) to directly link sign language users to each other and, through the use of video relay services (VRS), to link sign language users and speech readers with hearing phone users. VRS providers employ "Video Interpreters" (VI) to relay communication. As with specialized telephone equipment, videophones and Web cams are available for free for people w/specific disabilities (although waiting lists can be long). VRS calls are also free.

Who Uses VRS?

People who are deaf, hard of hearing or who have a speech disability and rely on sign language to communicate use VRS to reach hearing phone users. Hearing people use VRS to reach people with disabilities who communicate through manual sign language. The service is free for all users. Calls are free so long as they are within the U.S. Outbound international calling is available, but toll charges apply.

How are Services Provided?

VRS providers employ "Video Interpreters" (VIs) to relay communication. The FCC requires that VIs are "qualified." Some companies require national certification and/or state-level screenings. Others utilize their own screening standards to determine who they employ (you may wish to shop around).

People with disabilities access VRS with videophones (and a TV) or Web cams (and a computer). Callers provide the VI the phone number of the hearing party they are seeking to reach and the VI calls the hearing party on a standard phone line. Hearing callers dial a VRS toll free number to reach a VI and provide the ten digit number of the VRS user they are seeking to reach. In both cases the VI interprets between speech and sign language to facilitate communication.

VIs are required to abide by the confidentiality rules outlined by the FCC in Section 705 of the Communications Act (and outlined in the TRS rules 47 C.F.R. ァ 64.604). Mandatory minimum standards can be found at this FCC web page.

VRS users must register with a preferred (default) provider and get a ten digit telephone number to use VRS. This ensures the user efficient 911 access. The preferred VRS provider may be changed at any time (and the user may retain their ten digit number as well as their equipment). The user can still use any VRS service to make VRS calls. Users must obtain separate ten digit phone numbers for VRS and IP-Relay services. They may get separate ten digit numbers for different devices (such as a device at the office).

What Services are Provided?

  • Sign language to speech (English or Spanish) and speech to a sign language relay. Spanish language is now an FCC requirement. LifeLinks advertises relay available in dozens of languages.
  • HCO and VCO are generally available if you also have 2 phone lines w/3 way conferencing capability; this means a person with a speech disability may choose HCO to directly hear the person they are calling, but still use text to communicate, and a person who speaks but does not hear may use VCO to communicate with their own voice. The Ojo videophone has a 1 line VCO option (available through Snap!VRS).
  • Video mail options, address books, personal 800 numbers, and other special features are advertised by different VRS providers seeking to distinguish their services. Shop around!
  • Many VRS providers also have an IP-Relay service and can provide simultaneous text communication with VRS. This makes conveying certain kinds of information much easier (like data that require a high level of accuracy).
  • Unlike traditional relay, 900 number toll calls are NOT available (since VRS calls are not billed to users).
  • 911 dialing is available for VRS. VRS users register with a preferred (default) provider and provide their name and location. This is their "registered location." This allows the VRS provider to route the call to the appropriate 911 call center. All VRS users must register and get a ten digit number. Keep in mind, however, that VRS (and IP-Relay) are not available if there is a power outage or loss of internet connection. A standard landline with a TTY to dial 911 directly is the most reliable option.

Contact:

Click here for a list of national relay providers including providers of Video Relay Service.

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Captioned Telephone Service-read what is said with a CapTel phone

Captioned Telephone (or CapTel for short) is telephone technology that allows people to receive word–for–word captions of their telephone conversations.  The CapTel phone looks and works like an traditional phone, with callers talking and listening to each other, but with one very significant difference: captions are provided live for every phone call. The captions are displayed on the phone’s built in screen so the user can read the words while listening to the voice of the other party.

Who Uses Captioned Telephone Services?

CapTel is for a very specific audience and will not work for everyone. The person that can benefit the most is:

* A person who is late-deafened but is very familiar with using Voice Carry Over relay.
* A person with some residual hearing who needs amplification and then the reinforcement of reading the captions.
* A person who is ready to both hear the voice of the person talking and then see the captions come across the screen a few seconds later.
* A person who fully understands that this is a relay service and that there is a third party involved.

How are Services Provided?

Services are provided using voice-recognition technology. Captioning may not be 100% accurate.

What Services are Provided?

Voice Carry Over relay with English or Spanish captions.

Contact:

For more information about how to access Hamilton CapTel and apply for a CapTel phone in the state of Massachusetts, please call toll-free,1-800-300-5658. Or you can find out more about Hamilton CapTel on-line at: www.HamiltonCapTel.com or MassRelay.

National Relay Providers (TRS, VRS, IP-Relay):

TRS

www.consumer.att.com/relay
Nationwide English TRS Access:
(800) 855-2880 TTY users
(800) 855-2881 Voice users
(800) 855-2882 PC (ASCII) users
(800) 855-2883 Telebraille
(800) 229-5746 Speech-to-Speech English

Nationwide Spanish TRS Access:
(800) 855-2884 TTY Spanish
(800) 855-2885 Voice Spanish
(800) 855-2886 PC Spanish
(866) 260-9470 Speech-to-Speech Spanish

Instant Message-Relay

AT&T IM-Relay web page
Instant Messaging isavailable for mobile devices

VRS

www.zvrs.com
Hearing callers: (888) 888-1116 or deaf person's 1-800-VRS number provided by ZVRS
Notes: video interpreter certification requirements are not specified. No IP-relay. Enhanced VCO provided (single phone line option with a Z videophone.)

Federal Relay is available for all Federal Government employees (Civilian and Military) and postal workers who are active or retired, veterans and federally recognized tribal members in fifty states, U.S. Territorial, Guam, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, Northern Marianas and District of Columbia. The general public can also use the service to contact a Federal agency (i.e. IRS, SSA, FEMA) using Federal Relay.

TRS

www.gsa.gov/fedrelay
(800) 877-8339 TTY/ASCII/HCO
(877) 877-6280 VCO
(877) 877-8982 Speech-to-Speech
(800) 845-6136 Spanish (Voice and TTY-Spanish translation available upon request)
(800) 877-0996 FRS Customer Service (Voice/TTY, ASCII and Spanish)
(866) 377-8642 Voice
(866) 893-8340 Telebraille
(605) 331-4923 International Inbound (TTY/ASCII and Voice)
(800) 877-0996 Federal Relay Customer Service (Voice and TTY)
US Government Online TTY Directory: www.federaltty.us

IP-Relay

www.frso.us or www.federalip.us

VRS

www.myfedvrs.us
www.federalvrs.us
VRS IP address: fedvrs.tv (English) or espanol.myfedvrs.tv (Spanish), VC): vco.myfedvrs.tv

IP-Relay (also Instant Message Relay)

www.hamiltonrelay.com

Captioned Telephone Services

www.HamiltonCapTel.com

IP-Relay

www.hovrs.com
AIM screen name: HOVRS IM

VRS

www.hovrs.com
VRS IP address: HOVRS.TV
Hearing callers: (877) 467-4877 English; (877) 467-4875
Spanish (plus the deaf person's VRS extension #)
Notes: HOVRS advertises a hovrs Widget for use with the Macintosh.

IP-Relay

www.hawkrelay.com
AIM screen name: HawkRelay

VRS

www.hawkrelay.com
VRS IP address: HAWKRELAY.TV
Hearing callers: no number advertised
Notes: Hawk Relay is proposing creating a DeafBlind Relay service to the FCC.

IP-Relay

www.i711.com
AIM screen name: i711relay

VRS

www.i711.com
VRS IP address: i711.tv
Hearing callers: no number advertised
Notes: Spanish not yet available (as of 09/07). No video mail option.

VRS

www.snapvrs.com
VRS IP address: call.snapvrs.com (web cam) or 711 on the Ojo videophone
Hearing callers: (877) 711-SNAP(7627) (also need deaf person's phone number).
Note: Spanish not yet available. International calls to other Ojos are free.

IP-Relay

www.siprelay.com
AIM screen name: SIPRelay

VRS

www.sorenson.com
VRS IP address: "Dial VRS" speed button on your Sorenson videophone
Hearing callers: (866) FAST-VRS or 1-866-327-8877 plus the deaf caller's videophone# or IP address.
Notes: the Sorenson VRS service is not available for the Macintosh.

TRS

www.sprintrelay.com
Nationwide TRS Access:
(800) 877-8973 Voice/TTY/ASCII
(877) 826-2255 VCO
(800) 435-8590 Spanish
(877) 787-2660 Speech-to-Speech

IP-Relay

www.sprintip.com

VRS

www.sprintvrs.com
VRS IP address: 0sprintvrs
Hearing callers: (877) 709-5776

Verizon has a Center for Customers with Disabilities. Consultants at the centers are trained to understand accessibility issues, telecom technologies, and billing issues.

Contact:
1-800-974-6006 (Voice/TTY)

IP-Relay

www.ip-relay.com

 

VRS

Verizon Video Relay Web page
VRS IP address: TV.IPVRS.COM

The Verizon Wireless network can work with Video Relay Service (VRS). It requires:

  1. A PC card, while using it on a laptop with a webcam
  2. An Android device that has a front facing camera
  3. An iPhone 4 on Verizon Wireless
  4. A tablet with a front facing camera
  5. An iPad 2 with a front facing camera

Use of VRS requires a compatible application and data usage, which will be billing according to your data plan or package.

Text Relay

The Verizon Wireless network can be used to place or receive a call using a text relay service while on their text-capable Verizon Wireless device. The service requires a compatible application - available for Android, iPhones and Blackberry devices.

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